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I’ve Got Plenty of Nothing by Steven Guarnaccia

In “I’ve Got Plenty of Nothing” by Steven Guarnaccia, the author expresses his fascination with the concept of nothing and its potential for meaning. He collects various forms of nothing, including blank books, records, and magazines. Guarnaccia explores the idea that one person’s interpretation of nothing may be completely different from another’s. He also discusses the mysterious and disquieting nature of a blank page, as well as his inspiration for creating a book about nothing. Overall, this article invites readers to contemplate the significance and possibilities that can arise from emptiness.

I’ve Got Plenty of Nothing by Steven Guarnaccia

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The Fascination of Nothing

I’m fascinated by the idea of nothing. I think it’s really something. I love the blank page, waiting for a word or line to fill it, to give it meaning. And the blank page that’s happy in its blankness, feeling perfectly complete, fulfilled in its emptiness.

Collecting Nothing

I collect nothing. Lots of it. Or should I say, I collect Nothing (uppercase “N” nothing seems more Something than lowercase “n” nothing). I collect blank books full of Nothing, books about Nothing and records and magazines that have Nothing on their covers (think The White Album, by the Beatles). There’s Sounds, a book by Keith Godard, where all the pages are blank, but each is a different weight of paper. Turn the pages and you hear the book, rather than see it. Or Everything Men Know About Women (you can guess what’s printed on the pages inside of that book). Or Amnesia by John A. LaMacchia.

I’ve Got Plenty of Nothing by Steven Guarnaccia

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Blank Books of Nothingness

Blank books have a unique allure. They present endless possibilities, waiting to be filled with thoughts, ideas, and stories. The emptiness of the pages creates a sense of potential and invites the reader to become a creator. Blank books of nothingness symbolize a space for introspection and self-expression. Each empty page is an invitation to explore the depths of your imagination and see what unfolds.

John Cage’s 4′ 33″

John Cage’s composition, 4′ 33″, challenges our perception of silence and sound. It consists of a pianist coming onstage, opening the cover of a piano, sitting there for 4 minutes and 33 seconds, and then leaving, without once touching the keys. Some people would say they hear Nothing. Others hear the sound of the wind outside or the person next to them clearing their throat. One person’s Nothing is another person’s Something. Cage’s piece pushes us to contemplate the role of silence in our lives and question our understanding of what constitutes music.

I’ve Got Plenty of Nothing by Steven Guarnaccia

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The Mysterious Blank Page

A blank page is mysterious. It’s all potential, waiting to be filled. A dot will do, or a line. It takes just one word to break the blankness, one mark to fill the Nothing. A blank page is disquieting. We expect pages to talk back to us, to look us in the eye. A blank page just stares, blankly, into space. It can be both intimidating and inspiring, as it holds the promise of endless creations. The mystery of the blank page invites us to overcome our fear and embrace the unknown as we embark on our creative journey.

The Museum of Nothing

Imagine a museum dedicated to nothingness, a space where emptiness is celebrated as a form of art. Inspired by the idea of a Museum of Nothing, I envisioned a place that gradually comes to life as visitors explore its empty galleries. Two young visitors run from room to room, and as they “switch on” the rooms, each one reveals its treasures. The museum represents a paradoxical attraction, where nothing becomes something, and emptiness becomes a source of wonder and fascination.

I’ve Got Plenty of Nothing by Steven Guarnaccia

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Writing a Book About Nothing

How did I come to write a book about Nothing? I was trying to write a book about Something, and nothing was coming. I thought to myself, “It sure would be a lot easier to make a book about Nothing.” A lightbulb switched on (in an empty room, of course). The rest was easy. Writing a book about Nothing allowed me to explore the concept in depth and challenge the traditional notions of storytelling. It was an opportunity to embrace the blank page and celebrate the potential hidden within nothingness.

About the Author

Steven Guarnaccia is an illustrator and Professor Emeritus of Parsons School of Design. He was formerly Op-Ed art director of the New York Times. His work has appeared in major magazines and newspapers, including the New York Times, Abitare, and Rolling Stone. Guarnaccia has created murals for Disney and exhibition drawings for the Museum of Modern Art. Known for his contributions to popular culture and design, he has designed watches for Swatch and greeting cards for the Museum of Modern Art. Guarnaccia’s works have been recognized with awards from the AIGA, the Art Directors Club, and the Bologna Book Fair. He has had one-man shows internationally. In addition to his work for adults, Guarnaccia has also authored several children’s books, including his fairy tales about design, such as The Three Bears: A Tale Moderne, The Three Little Pigs: An Architectural Tale, and Cinderella: A Fashionable Tale.

I’ve Got Plenty of Nothing by Steven Guarnaccia

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Source: https://nerdybookclub.wordpress.com/2023/10/17/ive-got-plenty-of-nothing-by-steven-guarnaccia-2/